An Old Timey Favorite, Even Better!

While I was checking out recipes for more low-fat treats for my family, I ran across a good article about low-fat baking.  It’s an interview from Cooking Light with some kitchen folk who discuss how to change your recipes to be lower fat.  I was fascinated by what you can do lower the fat content in baked goods, and yet maintain the consistency of the end product.  I especially loved the fact that in Cooling Light’s recipes, they don’t use sugar substitutes (equal, splenda, etc.) for sugar, or applesauce for butter (which, as I’ve mentioned previously has been a fiasco with the guys).  Just on that last fact, I’m considering a subscription to their magazine…

I found a recipe for snickerdoodles that I wanted to test– not for my family, but for my sister Tina.  Her husband Jeff LOVES snickerdoodles; my family, not so much.  So I can have them all to myself, but I’ll give them to Tina to try; she’s always looking for ways to reduce fat in their diet.   This recipe uses half the butter and eggs as the standard recipes and replaces that with a little more sugar and corn syrup.  I replaced the corn syrup with golden syrup (cane syrup) that is primarily used in the UK; I think the flavor of golden syrup is way better than that clear stuff.

It’s basically the same technique as the chocolate chocolate chip cookies; cream butter and sugar, add egg, then flour.  Snickerdoodles are a little more time-consuming because you form balls of dough which you then roll in a cinnamon-sugar mixture.  These cookies bake for just five minutes to ensure that they stay soft, just like the originals.

Here’s how I made them:

I whisked the dry ingredients (flour, cream of tartar, baking soda) in a bowl.

The dry stuff

The dry stuff

Then I creamed the butter and sugar.

It's going to look like coarse sand because there's less butter.

It’s going to look like coarse sand because there’s less butter.

I added the egg, vanilla and golden syrup (original recipe has corn syrup),

The wet stuff

The wet stuff

and beat til blended.

Ready for the dry stuff

Ready for the dry stuff

Then I dumped in the dry stuff and mixed until it came together.

The dough is stiff, but malleable

The dough is stiff, but malleable

I chilled the dough in the fridge for 10 minutes; in the meantime, I mixed the sugar and cinnamon into a glass pie plate.

Heavy on the cinnamon

Heavy on the cinnamon

When the dough was ready, I formed small balls and rolled them in the sugar cinnamon mixture.

Make a bunch first, then roll.

Make a bunch first, then roll.

I placed them on cookies sheets lined with thin silicone pads, then pressed them down with a flat-bottomed glass.

Press gently, firmly, but do not completely flatten

Press gently, firmly, but do not completely flatten

They baked for 5 minutes, then cooled for 2 minutes on the sheets.  I then moved them to racks to finish cooling.

Soft, cinnamon cookies!

Soft, cinnamon cookies!

I tasted one– they were soft, tender and full of cinnamon flavor; they come out of the oven very soft and firm up a bit when cool, so I think they’ll stay soft for a few days.  I packed them into a plastic tub for Tina; she better share them with Jeff!

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1 Comment

Filed under Baked Goods, Cookies and Bars, Family, Food

One response to “An Old Timey Favorite, Even Better!

  1. Pingback: Applesauce Cookies | familyrecipebooks

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